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    Predatory Publishing

    References (1) Laakso M, Welling P, Bukvova H, Nyman L, Björk BC, Hedlund T. The development of open access journal publishing from 1993 to 2009. 2011. PLoS One, 6(6), e20961. (2) Butler D. Investigating journals: The dark side of publishing. Nature 2013,495(7442):433-435. (3) Gary Genosko. Open season on academics: My brush with predatory publishing. April 1st, 2014. http://www.academicmatters.ca/2014/04/open-season-on-academics-my-brush-with-predatory-publishing/#sthash.ZG2JX9p9.dpuf Academic Matters (4) John Bohannon. “Who’s Afraid of Peer Review: Data and Documents” 2013. Science, 342 (6154), [...]



    Media Relations

    Issue for reflection: There is an adage in journalism that you cannot be a good writer (communicator) if you do not read good writing. Here are some examples of good science writing, popularized by scientists and excellent science journalists, all awarded with important science- writing prizes for their accessibility in communicating science:



    Copyright, Licensing and Related Matters

    This  lecture is aimed at new scientific/scholarly authors who wish to learn more about alternative forms of publishing and licensing.  Compiler: Mrs Denise Rosemary Nicholson



    Title, Authors, Acknowledgements and the Introduction

    In this unit attention are being paid to the front matter of the paper and the Acknowledgement section. Although this might not be seen as the most important parts of the paper, it actually is. Following the specific journal guidelines shows that you are a professional scientist with respect for the editor and the reviewers. Compiler: Dr Hester Oosthuizen



    Strategies to Promote Scientific Writing – A Personal View

    Authors have to understand why they are doing scientific writing, and understand how  a scholarly scientific paper should be structured and how that promotes scientific writing. Compiler: Prof Laetus Lategan



    Results and Discussion Sections of Scientific Papers

    The Results and Discussion section is the most important part of an article. It is here that you convince your fellow scientists that your research is contributing new knowledge to your field of study. Compiler: Dr Hester Oosthuizen



    Publishing in the Social Sciences and Humanities

    You have completed your research, written up your thesis and had it passed, and now you want to proceed to the next step and publish your research. This module is about helping you think through how you might go about this. Compiler: Prof Catriona Macleod



    The ‘Attitudinal Psychology’ of Drafting and Writing

    Many young scholars and postgraduate people have difficulties developing a productive mental approach to ‘writing up’ their research work and results. This lecture tries to address these issues and  seeks to offer some advise. Compiler: Prof Wieland Gevers



    Open Access Publishing, Licensing and Related Matters

     This  lecture is aimed at new scientific/scholarly authors who wish to learn more about alternative forms of publishing and licensing. Compiler: Mrs Denise Rosemary Nicholson



    Methods sections in scientific papers

    The purpose of this section is to present your experimental design or describe how the study was performed. It should contain sufficient information for the reader to duplicate the experiment exactly and to replicate your work. Compiler: Prof Willie van Heerden



    Use of English in writing scholarly/scientific papers

    This is a general guide to the use of English in writing-up your research in the form of an original article or letter. Compiler: Prof Wieland Gevers



    Drafting, submitting and publishing a scientific article/paper

    Drafting, submitting and publishing an article / paper: journal choice; ‘instructions to authors’; house styles; first drafts; collaborator review; authorship issues; editorial discretion and peer review; revisions and re-submissions; dissertations and peer- reviewed publications; hierarchies in publishing; questions of character and conviction in overcoming obstacles Compiler: Prof James Bull



    Citation practice in scholarly/scientific writing

    General logic and ‘rulebook’; considerations of priority, utility and relevance; different citation conventions and their advantages/ disadvantages; self-citation; citation indexing: history, simple article citation rates and journal impact factors, higher order data analysis, and proper place in general impact analysis. Compiler: Prof Wieland Gevers



    General

     This section gives a general overview and information than can be applied to all or most documentation.



    Citation practice in scholarly / scientific writing

    General logic and ‘rulebook’; considerations of priority, utility and relevance; different citation conventions and their advantages/ disadvantages; self-citation; citation indexing: history, simple article citation rates and journal impact factors, higher order data analysis, and proper place in general impact analysis. Compiler: Prof Wieland Gevers